Housman Country: Into the Heart of England

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - Housman country is a vivid exploration of England and Englishness, in which Parker maps out terrain that is as historical and emotional as it is topographical. Housman and his most famous book, and in doing so shows how A Shropshire Lad has permeated English life and culture since its publication. In housman country, Peter Parker explores the lives of A.

E. Its evocation of the english coun - tryside, thwarted love, and a yearning for things lost is as potent today as it was more than a century ago, and the book has never been out of print. Housman’s a shropshire lad made little impression when it was first published in 1896 but has since become one of the best-loved volumes of poetry in the English language.

Housman Country: Into the Heart of England #ad - Housman and the influence of his particular brand of EnglishnessA. E. A new york times book review editor's choice and Nominated for the 2017 PEN/Bograd Weld Prize for BiographyA captivating exploration of A. E. Everyone has a personal “land of lost content” with “blue remembered hills, ” and Housman has been a tangible and far-reaching presence in a startling range of work, from the war poets and Ralph Vaughan Williams to Inspector Morse and Morrissey.

The poems were taken to war by soldiers who wanted to carry England in their pockets, and have influ - enced poetry, fiction, music, were adapted by composers trying to create a new kind of English music, and drama right up to the present day.

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A Shropshire Lad and Other Poems: The Collected Poems of A.E. Housman Penguin Classics

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Penguin #ad - A Shropshire Lad and Other Poems: The Collected Poems of A.E. Housman Penguin Classics #ad - This volume brings together 'a shropshire lad' 1896 and 'last poems' 1922, and three translations of extracts from Aeschylus, along with the posthumous selections 'More Poems' and 'Additional Poems', Sophocles and Euripides that display his mastery of Classical literature. A. They are expressed in simple rhythms, yet show a fine ear for the subtleties of metre and alliteration.

His scope is wide - ranging from religious doubt to intense nostalgia for the countryside. E. Housman was one of the best-loved poets of his day, whose poems conjure up a potent and idyllic rural world imbued with a poignant sense of loss.

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A Shropshire Lad Macmillan Collector's Library Book 145

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Macmillan Collector's Library #ad - Inspirational for generations of readers, has found its way into the canon of English folksong and has been set to music by composers George Butterworth, with its sweeping themes of youth and love, A Shropshire Lad, John Ireland and Ralph Vaughan Williams. Housman's a shropshire lad features the superb wood engravings of the Vorticist artist and illustrator Agnes Miller Parker, and is accompanied by an afterword by Dr David Butterfield, Editor of the Housman Society Journal.

A Shropshire Lad Macmillan Collector's Library Book 145 #ad - Designed to appeal to the booklover, the Macmillan Collector’s Library is a series of beautiful gift editions of much loved classic titles. Macmillan collector’s Library are books to love and treasure. E. Set in a semi-imaginary pastoral shropshire, Housman’s verse considers the helplessness of man, the fragility of life and the terrible effects of war, against the background of an achingly beautiful countryside.

This beautiful Macmillan Collector’s Library edition of A. Evocative of ‘the blue remembered hills’ of his youth, Alfred Edward Housman’s A Shropshire Lad is a collection of sixty-three poems of extraordinary beauty and feeling.

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The Collected Poems of A.E. Housman 2 collections of Poetry with an active Table of Contents

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A & L eBooks #ad - The Collected Poems of A.E. Housman 2 collections of Poetry with an active Table of Contents #ad - Housman--a shropshire lad and last poems, totaling 104 poems! It includes an active Table of Contents and has been formatted for smooth navigation and optimal viewing on the Kindle! This collection contains 2 collections of poems from A. E.

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The World Broke in Two: Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, D. H. Lawrence, E. M. Forster, and the Year That Changed Literature

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Henry Holt and Co. #ad - S. As 1922 begins, all four are literally at a loss for words, confronting an uncertain creative future despite success in the past. Forster, and D. Eliot, E. Lawrence, make over the course of one pivotal year. Lawrence during 1922, virginia woolf, the birth year of modernismThe World Broke in Two tells the fascinating story of the intellectual and personal journeys four legendary writers, T.

Forster and D. S. Based on original research, bill goldstein's The World Broke in Two captures both the literary breakthroughs and the intense personal dramas of these beloved writers as they strive for greatness. M. H. The literary ground is shifting, as ulysses is published in February and Proust’s In Search of Lost Time begins to be published in England in the autumn.

The World Broke in Two: Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, D. H. Lawrence, E. M. Forster, and the Year That Changed Literature #ad - H. M. Eliot, E. Dalloway, his unjustly neglected and most autobiographical novel, forster has, for the first time in nearly a decade, Lawrence has written Kangaroo, returned to work on the novel that will become A Passage to India, and Eliot has finished—and published to acclaim—“The Waste Land. As willa cather put it, “the world broke in two in 1922 or thereabouts, ” and what these writers were struggling with that year was in fact the invention of modernism.

Yet, dismal as their prospects seemed in January, by the end of the year Woolf has started Mrs.

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Bismarck: A Life

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Oxford University Press #ad - This riveting, new york times bestselling biography illuminates the life of Otto von Bismarck, the statesman who unified Germany but who also embodied everything brutal and ruthless about Prussian culture. Jonathan steinberg draws heavily on contemporary writings, allowing Bismarck's friends and foes to tell the story.

But all agreed there was also something demonic, overwhelming, beyond human attributes, diabolical, in Bismarck's personality. As one contemporary noted: "the Bismarck regime was a constant orgy of scorn and abuse of mankind, collectively and individually. In this comprehensive and expansive biography--a brilliant study in power--Jonathan Steinberg brings Bismarck to life, revealing the stark contrast between the "Iron Chancellor's" unmatched political skills and his profoundly flawed human character.

Bismarck: A Life #ad - His brilliance and insight dazzled his contemporaries. He was a kind of malign genius who, behind the various postures, concealed an ice-cold contempt for his fellow human beings and a drive to control and rule them. Bismarck may have been in sheer ability the most intelligent man to direct a great state in modern times.

What rises from these pages is a complex giant of a man: a hypochondriac with the constitution of an ox, a brutal tyrant who could easily shed tears, a convert to an extreme form of evangelical Protestantism who secularized schools and introduced civil divorce.

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A.E. Housman: Hero of the Hidden Life

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Boydell Press #ad - Until now, he has remained a hidden personality, held in the public mind as prim and grim. To be sexually different in the time of Oscar Wilde was to invite ostracism and disgust. Housman 1859-1936 was both a celebrated poet and the foremost classicist of his day. His renowned a shropshire lad and Last Poems were born of an inner crisis, sparked by a profound but unreciprocated attachment for a fellow undergraduate.

His poetry was set to music by numerous composers including Arthur Somervell, George Butterworth, Ivor Gurney, Ralph Vaughan Williams, John Ireland and Samuel Barber. This biography reveals by contrast a man of many facets, one companionable in small groups, generous to a fault, and always on the lookout for humour and fun; a master of English prose; a witty and compelling after-dinner speaker; an occasional writer of nonsense verse; a frequenter of the music hall; an intrepid early traveller by air; and a connoisseur of food and wine.

A.E. Housman: Hero of the Hidden Life #ad - The book was shortlisted for the bbc 4 samuel johnson Prize for non-fiction, was a New York Times Notable Book and was named one of Atlantic Monthly's Books of the Year. It weaves together his scholarly life and the biographical elements in his poetry to examine his emotional and sexual needs with dispassion and empathy and to uncover his hidden sensibilities and creative world.

Following oxford he was commissioned in the Navy, spending most of his time with the Royal Marines. Drawing on housman's published letters and on 81 significant new finds, Edgar Vincent conjures up a new Housman, created out of his reactions to the events of his life as he experienced them. A.

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The Man in the Red Coat

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Knopf #ad - In time, but who were they then and what was the significance of their sojourn to England? Answering these questions, each of these men would achieve a certain level of renown, Julian Barnes unfurls the stories of their lives which play out against the backdrop of the Belle Époque in Paris. Our guide through this world is samuel pozzi, the society doctor, free-thinker and man of science with a famously complicated private life who was the subject of one of John Singer Sargent's greatest portraits.

. In this vivid tapestry of people henry james, but, place, sarah bernhardt, surprisingly, Oscar Wilde, Proust, among many others, and time, one of violence, we see not merely an epoch of glamour and pleasure, James Whistler, prejudice, and nativism--with more parallels to our own age than we might imagine.

The Man in the Red Coat #ad - From the man booker prize-winning author of the sense of an Ending--a rich, via the remarkable life story of the pioneering surgeon, witty, revelatory tour of Belle Époque Paris, Samuel Pozzi. In the summer of 1885, three frenchmen arrived in London for a few days' intellectual shopping: a prince, a count, and a commoner with an Italian name.

The man in the red coat is, at once, a fresh portrait of the belle Époque; an illuminating look at the longstanding exchange of ideas between Britain and France; and a life of a man who lived passionately in the moment but whose ideas and achievements were far ahead of his time.

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Henry David Thoreau: A Life

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University of Chicago Press #ad - The result is a thoreau unlike any seen since he walked the streets of Concord, a Thoreau for our time and all time.  . Walden. What did that portend for the contemplative individual and abundant, published and unpublished, wild nature that Thoreau celebrated? Drawing on Thoreau’s copious writings, Walls presents a Thoreau vigorously alive in all his quirks and contradictions: the young man shattered by the sudden death of his brother; the ambitious Harvard College student; the ecstatic visionary who closed Walden with an account of the regenerative power of the Cosmos.

Many books have taken up various aspects of thoreau’s character and achievements, but, “Thoreau has never been captured between covers; he was too quixotic, mischievous, as Laura Dassow Walls writes, many-sided. Two hundred years after his birth, and two generations after the last full-scale biography, Walls restores Henry David Thoreau to us in all his profound, inspiring complexity.

Henry David Thoreau: A Life #ad - Walls traces the full arc of thoreau’s life, and “america was a family affair, from his early days in the intellectual hothouse of Concord, when the American experiment still felt fresh and precarious, earned by one generation and about to pass to the next. By the time he died in 1862, at only forty-four years of age, Thoreau had witnessed the transformation of his world from a community of farmers and artisans into a bustling, interconnected commercial nation.

Yesterday I came here to live. That entry from the journal of henry David Thoreau, and the intellectual journey it began, would by themselves be enough to place Thoreau in the American pantheon. We meet the man whose belief in human freedom and the value of labor made him an uncompromising abolitionist; the solitary walker who found society in nature, but also found his own nature in the society of which he was a deeply interwoven part.

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Bagehot: The Life and Times of the Greatest Victorian

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Drawing on a wealth of historical documents, correspondence, and publications, Grant paints a vivid portrait of the banker and his world. He was also a misogynist, and while he opposed slavery, he misjudged Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War. Banker, man of letters, inventor of the treasury bill, and author of Lombard Street, the still-canonical guide to stopping a run on the banks, Bagehot prescribed the doctrines that—decades later—inspired the radical responses to the world’s worst financial crises.

Born in the small market town of langport, just after the panic of 1825 swept across England, Bagehot followed in his father’s footsteps and took a position at the local family bank—but his influence on financial matters would soon spread far beyond the county of Somerset. As a prolific essayist on wide-ranging topics, Bagehot won the admiration of Matthew Arnold and Woodrow Wilson, and delighted in paradox.

Bagehot: The Life and Times of the Greatest Victorian #ad - Persuasive and precocious, making high-profile friends, he came to hold sway in political circles, including William Gladstone—and enemies, such as Lord Overstone and Benjamin Disraeli. He has been called "the Greatest Victorian. In james grant’s colorful and groundbreaking biography, Bagehot appears as both an ornament to his own age and a muse to our own.

The definitive biography of one of the most brilliant and influential financial minds—banker, essayist, and editor of the Economist. During the upheavals of 2007–09, the chairman of the Federal Reserve had the name of a Victorian icon on the tip of his tongue: Walter Bagehot.

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